What is Motivation

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If you want to achieve success at work, then the ability to motivate yourself and others is a crucial skill. Both at work and at home, people who can motivate other people to do what they want done are more successful at accomplishing their goals and vision.

Motivation can be defined as ‘ the driving force by which humans achieve their goals’.

Motivation can be either intrinsic—from within, or extrinsic—from the environment.

Intrinsic motivation is driven by interest or enjoyment in the task itself, and exists within the individual.

Extrinsic motivation comes from the environment and includes factors like money, tittles, and even negative motivation like threat of punishment, or fear of losing one’s job.

There are many theories regarding human motivation which can be divided into the following categories:

  • Incentive theories
  • Drive Reduction  theories
  • Need theories which includes Herzberg’s two-factor theory
  • Broad theories
  • Cognitive theories

While all of these theories are important and relevant in their own right, we will focus on understanding Herzberg’s two factor theory for the purpose of learning how to motivate and focus our team members more effectively and to achieve better results.

Motivation Strategies

Over the next couple of pages we will look at understanding what is Herzberg’s two factor theory of motivation and why it is still relevant. We will also look at ways to motivate different employees in your team and why you need to be a motivating leader.

1. Herzberg’s Motivation Theory

According to this theory the factors that cause job satisfaction and consequently employee motivation are different from those that cause employee dissatisfaction.

Factors that lead to employee motivation and satisfaction include achievement, recognition, the work itself, responsibility, advancement and growth.

On the other hand factors that lead to dissatisfaction include company policy, supervision, relationships with supervisors, work conditions, salary and relationships with peers. The presence of these maintenance or hygiene factors however does not lead to employee motivation, their absence does however cause dissatisfaction.

Hence the opposite of satisfaction in this case is not dissatisfaction but NO satisfaction while the opposite of dissatisfaction is not satisfaction but no dissatisfaction.

 

Why is it relevant today?

 

What this means is that you as a manager must provide both hygiene or maintenance factors in order to prevent employee dissatisfaction along with motivating factors to

increase employee satisfaction.

 

According to this theory many of the factors that lead to employee motivation are

intrinsic, which is why managers should take care to ensure that the job challenges the employee and makes use of his skills, allows for increased responsibility, achievement and growth.

2. Why is it relevant today?What this means is that you as a manager must provide both hygiene or maintenance factors in order to prevent employee dissatisfaction along with motivating factors to increase employee satisfaction.

According to this theory many of the factors that lead to employee motivation are intrinsic, which is why managers should take care to ensure that the job challenges the employee and makes use of his skills, allows for increased responsibility, achievement and growth.

3. Why you need to be a motivating leader?

Rather than relying on company policy, the compensation structure etc. to motivate your employees, it is important for you to be a motivating leader in order to understand what energizes your team and what makes them happy and willing to work harder and more efficiently. As a leader it is also important for you to understand how to motivate the different types of personalities within your team.

4. Motivating Autonomy Seekers

An employee who is in search of autonomy is motivated by the desire to have some choice and control over what he does. He prefers work that allows him to think and act independently and is willing to set and follow his own personal standards regardless of the environment.

To motivate autonomy seekers:

  • Delegate and provide authority
  • Don’t micromanage
  • Ask for their ideas and recommendations
  • Respect their independence and do not force them to conform
  • Be generous with responsibility.

5. Motivating Achievement Seekers

Employees who are motivated by performance and competence, enjoy doing work that is linked to tangible results. They tend to be comfortable with work that is challenging and focused on goal setting and goal accomplishment.

To motivate achievement seekers:

  • Keep them updated about their progress
  • Give them constructive feedback and praise their accomplishments
  • Set challenging goals and give them the big picture
  • Respect their need to know the plan and share information openly

6. Motivating Affiliation Seekers

Employees who have a high need to affiliate with others are motivated by a sense of community and camaraderie . He or she prefers to work in teams, and values relationships. These employees are motivated by mentor-mentee relationships.

To motivate affiliation seekers:

  • Share networks and create opportunities for mentoring
  • Include them in team projects
  • Appreciate their ability to build and maintain relationships
  • Be generous with your attention and involve them in activities.

7. Motivating Actualisation Seekers

Employees that value actualisation seek a sense of purpose and principle.

To motivate actualisation seekers:

  • Listen to them when they voice their concerns.
  • Help them connect their work and life goals to each other.
  • Respect their personal beliefs and values and align those with their work.
  • Give them your respect and the time to think and reflect on the task at hand.